Virtual Exhibitions



Audrey Flack (American, b. 1931) Medea, 2007, Purchased with funds provided by Knox and May Ann Keith Massey, 2007.6

She Persists


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She Persists coincides with the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment and looks closely at the ways in which female artists in CAM’s collection persist in their own lives, in their communities, in their world, both personally and politically --- through their art. From Mary Cassatt to Beverly Buchanan this exhibition creates a powerful dialogue about what it means to be a woman.



Exhibition sponsored in part by: Louise Mann In honor of Anne Brennan • Dr. Bill Malloy and Maxine Terry in honor of Dr. Carol Malloy • Elizabeth Wells in loving memory of Nell Webb • Mort and Judy Neblett • FOX Wilmington • Frances Goodman in memory of my mother, Barbara D. Lane • Jean Keller in memory of Mary C. Hoey and Louise C. Graham • Jennifer Kraner honoring CAM and its ever increasing presence in our school system and in our lives. • Anonymous sponsor in Honor and Gratitude for Mary Cecil Dodge



Claude Howell (American 1915-1997), Back Porch (detail),oil on canvas, 1950. Gift of Richard E Tomes in memory of John G. Croley

Claude Howell: Carolina Interpreter


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Claude Howell (March 17, 1915 – February 3, 1997) This exhibition focuses on the life and work of one of North Carolina’s most notable artists. Howell holds an established place in the vanguard of North Carolina art. A brilliant colorist and meticulous draftsman, he is best known for his intimate examination of the southern coast: the quality of light and life of its people.




Elizabeth Bradford, Duckweed as Constellation (detail), acrylic and glitter. Collection of the artist

A House of One Room: Elizabeth Bradford



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How hard to realize that every camp of men or beast has this glorious starry firmament for a roof! In such places standing alone on the mountain top it is easy to realize that whatever special nests we make – leaves and moss like the marmots and birds, or tents and piled stones – we all dwell in a house of one room – the world with the firmament for its roof – and are sailing the celestial spaces without leaving any track.
John Muir (Unpublished Journals of John Muir, 1938, p. 321)

This new virtual exhibition is a sneak preview into what will be a full-scale exhibition by Elizabeth Bradford during CAM’s exhibition schedule in later 2020-2021 (actual dates TBA). Bradford’s masterful paintings originate from an intimate observation and profound reverence for the natural environment. These selections offer an invitation to share Bradford’s journey as she explores the wonder of the natural world. The reverence she has for the environment and all of its inhabitants, can inspire a deeper awareness of our interconnectedness and responsibility for its preservation and survival. This exhibition is made possible thanks to the generous underwriting of the Wells Fargo Foundation. Wells Fargo is proud to support access to arts experiences and advocate for environmental preservation.




Phil Freelon in front of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington, D.C., 2016

Structure in Space and Time - Photography by Phil Freelon


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One of the most celebrated architects of our time, Phil Freelon designed spaces that enhanced communities and championed diversity and inclusion. His work, which included museums and cultural institutions, told the story of the American people. Freelon was dedicated to bringing both beautiful and functional high-quality designs into everyday life for all people. Throughout his career, Freelon found photography essential to his design vision and creative process.

Visibly apparent in his artwork is how architecture and nature complement the landscape: Photography is one of the vehicles that I use to share my view of the world. As an Architect, the expression of Structure is central to my design process, bringing a sense of order to the final composition. These photographs examine the Structure that exists all around us - both in the natural and built environment. Behind the lens, I seek to capture those fragments of space and time that invite closer examination.

Everyone at CAM is deeply saddened by the passing of Phil Freelon on July 9, 2019. If you would like to honor his legacy you may make contributions to the North Star Church of the Arts.

CAM wishes to thank Craven Allen Gallery and Ben Alper for their generous support of this exhibition.


Fred Wilson (American, 1954) Band (detail), 2004, Spit bite aquatint on Sommerset textured paper, ed. 9/20, Published by Crown Point Press and printed by Case Hudson, Gift of Daniel Kilpatrick and George Loudis, San Fransisco in memory of John, Irene, and Mark Brennan, 2014.9

Stories in Print


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This focused exhibition draws attentions to the diverse methods of print making from CAM's collection from 1891 through 2012. Artists on view include Don Furst, Maud Gatewood, Juan Logan, and Fred Wilson. These varied artists juxtaposed against the Modernist prints in The Eye Learns highlight CAM's commitment to the art of print making.



Louise Belden at home (close up), 2016

The Eye Learns - Modernist prints from
the Louis Belden Collection


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The critical eye, you don’t have it initially. The eye learns from experience and it takes time. - Louis Belden (1926-2017)


San Francisco art collector Louis Belden gave his art collection, the gift of his lifetime, to our community. This collection of prints invites us to share in his passions for art, for collecting, for learning, and for giving back. These works offer a range of expression, experimentation, and expansion of the terrain of postwar modernism and post-modernism. His gift to Cameron Art Museum is truly unprecedented in our region, giving future generations access to this treasure for years to come.

These 134 modernist prints by 51 artists reveal Belden’s journey and are primarily presented in the order he acquired them. The exhibition begins with his bold 1971 acquisition, Art Beat, a neon orange silk screen by Nobu Fukui. By the mid-1990s, he had acquired work by the leading artists, the change-makers, the radicals, such as Josef Albers, Alexander Calder, Helen Frankenthaler, Robert Rauschenberg, and Wayne Thiebaud. His final acquisitions of work by Richard Diebenkorn, Jasper Johns, and Ellsworth Kelly show the continuing growth and refinement of the collection.

Art is not stagnant. It grows and grows and grows. There will be new trends, some of which will be successful and some will not be and I have no idea what those trends will be. But it is exciting to wait around and see what does evolve. Certainly I have evolved in the last 20 years and plan to continue to evolve in the future.

Sponsored in part by: Hampton Inn Medical Park, Live Oak Private Wealth, LS3P, Dr. William Malloy, Syneos Health, LLC, Wilmington Wealth Consulting.



Modernism and Music: The Eye Learns also features an interactive, musical component that will give visitors the opportunity to listen to music specially selected for some artworks by a variety of music professionals from the community and by CAM staff based on the artists’ own connections to music. Visitors will also have the opportunity to make their own musical suggestions for other guests to listen to. This additional musical element will give visitors an enjoyably different way to create a powerful art experience. Click here for access to The Eye Learns: Modernism and Music