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US Colored Troops and Civil War Living History

Saturday, 2/23/2019
10:00AM-2:00PM  
The American Civil War shaped the history of Wilmington and North Carolina in many ways. Discover and discuss the roles and impacts of United States Colored Troops with reenactors utilizing three stations highlighting Camp Life, North Carolina Battles and Slavery, plus two Living History personalities, Harriet Tubman (Carolyn Evans) and Frederick Douglass (Malcolm Beech).

Enjoy a talk by Wilmington’s Civil War historian Dr. Chris E. Fonvielle Jr., 1:00 pm in Studio 1. Also, all day in Studio 1 watch the documentary short "The Battle of Forks Road" (24 min., 2015).
Free and open to the public. Cameron Art Museum Grounds and Studio 1.


THEATRE: "Wilmington Reconstructed"

Saturday, 2/23/2019
2:00PM-3:00PM  
STAGED READING: "Wilmington Reconstructed" - Mouths of Babe Theatre Company

In November of 1898, a group of white supremacists seized the city of Wilmington in a violent coup, expelling prominent black citizens and destroying Wilmington's Black newspaper: "The Daily Record". The event was covered up and whitewashed for the better part of a century. This work-in-progress documentary play by Mouths of Babes Theatre Company follows the "New York Times Magazine" writer John Jeremiah Sullivan as he enlists 8th graders to track down and recover lost articles of "The Daily Record", literally reconstructing the lost history of that period, and bringing to light voices that hate sought to destroy.
Free and open to the public. Weyerhaeuser Reception Hall

GROUP SINGING: Wilmington Sacred Harp Singers

Sunday, 2/24/2019
1:30PM-4:00PM  
Wilmington Sacred Harp Singers (http://bit.ly/WilmNCSacredHarp) presents a traditional Sacred Harp Singing and invite you to join in the music and raise your voice in song! This dynamic form of a cappella social singing dates back to Colonial America, using a modern reprint of the 1844 songbook "The Sacred Harp". Sacred Harp and related shape-note styles are the oldest continuous singing traditions in the United States. Surviving as a living tradition in parts of the South, notably Georgia and Alabama, Sacred Harp music has been discovered by new generations of singers who have spread the heritage across North America and to Australia and Europe.

The music is loud, vigorous and intense. It is meant to be sung, not just observed. No previous experience is necessary. 1:30 pm: Instruction for beginners, 2:00 - 4 pm: Group Singing, all. Songbooks provided, beginners welcome! Learn more about Sacred Harp singing at fasola.org. Free and open to the public. Weyerhaeuser Reception Hall.